Conduct public inquiry into Boateng-Gyan tape – Nyaho Temakloe

A founding member of the New Patriotic Party (NPP), Dr Nyaho Nyaho-Tamakloe, has called for a non-partisan public inquiry into the ‘Yaw Boateng-Gyan tape’ saga.

The move, he stated, would ensure the integrity of the country’s democracy.

The public inquiry, he noted, should comprise a Supreme Court judge, a retired senior military officer, a representative of National Security and a respectable person from civil society.

A tape recording purported to have the voices of Mr Yaw Baoateng-Gyan, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) into a Special Force of the Ghana Armed Forces whose members would later be given National Security identification cards to enable them to infiltrate the ranks of some parties especially the National Democratic Party (NDP).

The plan, according to the voices, was to find information about the strategies of the NDP and its likely impact on the fortunes of the NDC in the December elections.

It also made reference to issuing the operatives with National Security identification cards but was not sure about the support from National Security, since in the past such provisions had been abused by those the party recruited for a similar exercise.

The recording also made references to the motivational package for the persons to be engaged which included a GH¢5,000 for the wives of the people to start a business.

Mr Boateng-Gyan has confirmed that the voice of the recording is his, prompting calls from several quarters including the New Patriotic Party (NPP) for his arrest.

The issues raised on the tape, Dr Nyaho-Tamakloe stated, had a lot of security implications saying, “a National Security investigation of the case is wholly inadequate, and smacks of a cover-up by a state institution that is itself implicated in the tape.”

He said Ghanaians were losing confidence in the office of the National Security Coordinator as an institution since instead of concerning itself with national security; the office was now prioritising the security of the NDC regime.

“As things now stand, there is cause for parties in opposition to be disturbed. There are chilling references on the tape to covert surveillances of the top opposition functionaries. This is a throwback to the surveillance, abduction and murders of judges in the 1980s.”

The tape, he stated, created context for acts of political violence in the Chereponi, Atiwa, Agbogbloshie and Akwatia, all of which, he observed, remained unresolved.

To President Mahama, he pointed out that, “this is the time for the President to demonstrate a departure from, the hear-no-evil, see no-evil posture of the NDC Presidency since 2009.”

“Ghanaians will not be deterred by the circling of the NDC wagons to prevent probity and accountability in this case,” he said.